The 2014 World Report - Egypt

 

Excerpt:

Prior to his removal, President Morsy’s Muslim Brotherhood-dominated government had shown disregard for rights protections, with an increase in the prosecutions of journalists, police abuse, and sectarian violence. In December 2012, 33 percent of eligible voters (the lowest turnout for any poll since the 2011 uprising) approved Morsy’s controversial new constitution by 64 percent in a referendum. The constitution further undermined key rights protections following Morsy’s November 2012 Constitutional Declaration which immunized his decisions from judicial review. Legislation issued by the Shura Council, Egypt’s interim legislative body following the June 2012 dissolution of the People’s Assembly, included deeply restrictive draft public assembly and draft associations laws.

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VIOLENCE AGAINST COPTS IN EGYPT

Summary: The Egyptian Orthodox Christian community—the Copts—has been the tar- get of violence and discrimination since the 1970s and especially following the revolution that overthrew Hosni Mubarak. The Egyptian state has done little to remedy the situation and has at times enabled the conflict between Muslims and Christians. Achieving religious freedom and equality depends on building state institutions that can guarantee all citizens’ constitutional rights.

 

Violence Against Copts in Egypt

The Egyptian Orthodox Christian community—the Copts—has been the target of violence and discrimination since the 1970s and especially following the revolution that overthrew Hosni Mubarak. The Egyptian state has done little to remedy the situation and has at times enabled the conflict between Muslims and Christians. Achieving religious freedom and equality depends on building state institutions that can guarantee all citizens’ constitutional rights.

MASS ATTACK ON CHURCHES IN EGYPT

On 14 August 2013, 64 churches, schools and other Coptic community buildings, and 390 private homes and businesses were vandalized and set ablaze by Islamists.
This may be the largest number of attacks in one day since 16 May, 1320,under the Mamluks'rule.

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The Coptic Church in Peril: The Islamization of Egypt and the End of Egyptian Christianity

On 15 October 1970, Anwar El Sadat succeeded Gamal Abdel Nasser as President of Egypt. Viewed as a mediocre man, Sadat's true qualities were not realized by Nasser's old guard until it was too late.

Having crushed his internal opponents in May 1971, Sadat faced the overwhelming challenge of trying to find a way out of the predicament Egypt was in after its humiliating defeat by Israel in 1967. After some hesitation, he finally moved forward by launching an attack on Israel on 6 October 1973. The initial success of the Egyptian war effort gave the country a new sense of pride and its leader a much-needed legitimacy.

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Sixth Annual Conference

Coptic Solidarity 2015 Conference

The Annual Conference was held in Washington, D.C. on June 11-13, 2015.

 

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