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The Islamic State’s Christian and Yizidi Sex Slaves
By Nina Shea

Unlike Muslims, who can conform and wait out ISIS until the day it is defeated, Christians, along with "polytheist" Yizidis, can don veils and give up cigarettes and alcohol, but, as non-Muslims, their very presence is an intolerable offense to the year-old "caliphate." These minority religious groups in Iraq and Syria, lacking protecting armies or militias of their own, find themselves in unique peril. During his Bolivian trip this month, Pope Francis called it "genocide."

 

 

 

Assyrian Christian Woman Shares Story of Captivity by Islamic State
By Al-Monitor

A total of 253 Assyrian Christians, from 35 different villages along the Khabur River were kidnapped by the Islamic State on Feb. 23 in the governorate of Hasakah, Syria. A small group of 23 elderly individuals were released March 1, allegedly due to their age.

 

 

 

The March to Damascus
By Nick Danforth - FP

A short history of Turkish threats to invade Syria and why they've failed to produce a stable Middle East - and probably won't this time, either.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Muslim Brotherhood is Extremist, Violence a Core Creed and Practice
By Youssef Wardani - Ahram Weekly

Muslim Brotherhood was the mother movement for the use of jihadist violence. All militant jihadist organizations of all stripes trace their ideological, organizational and operational outlooks and practices to the Muslim Brotherhood experience.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Who Is Running the Egyptian State?
By Nathan J. Brown and Katie Bentivoglio - WP

For scholars and many journalists, most non-democratic regimes look the same: they are led and designed by autocratic dictators—or sometimes by small cliques—according to the leader’s whims and interests. “Pinochet’s Chile” was often portrayed as the projection of the will of a single general, and the Chinese political system is seen as the operation of a few leading Communist Party members and state officials. Political scientists have taken great strides in recent years to uncover how dictators design systems and even use outwardly democratic tools like elections to cement their rule.


Two Christians Killed in Egypt by Muslim Racketeering Gang

A Christian man and his son were shot dead in Egypt when he refused to pay extortion money demanded by a Muslim racketeer, who has been kidnapping Christians for ransom.

The offender went to the home of Moawad Assad, a building contractor, in Nag Hammadi on 26 January to collect the money that he had demanded three days earlier. The Christian refused to go to his car for fear of being kidnapped. Four men armed with machine guns then got out of the vehicle and opened fire on Moawad and his 26-year-old son Assad Moawad, an engineer. They were both killed instantly.

The racketeer and his gang have been extorting money from Christians and kidnapping their children for ransom for some months; eleven Christians were seized between 11 August and 24 December 2011 in Nag Hammadi and neighbouring Farshoot and Bahgoura.

A senior Christian leader in Nag Hammadi said all the incidents had been reported to the police. He questioned why the ringleader, who is well known to the police, has not been arrested and called on the authorities to protect Christians in the Nag Hammadi area, “who are continuously being subjected to terror and kidnapping”.

Mob attack

Elsewhere in Egypt, a mob of Muslims attacked Christians and their property in the village of Kobry-el-Sharbat in Alexandria on 28 January. Two Christians and one Muslim were injured in the violence; homes and shops were looted before being set ablaze.

Muslims descended on the village after a rumour spread that a Christian man had taken photos of Muslim women. A Christian activist said that the allegation was made by a Muslim man when the Christian man refused to pay extortion money that the former had demanded from him.

The Christian’s home was looted and torched, and the homes of a further 11 Christian families attacked.

Eyewitnesses said that the perpetrators were Salafists and some were from the Muslim Brotherhood.

Reconciliation meetings were held in the village in which the aggressors demanded the forced displacement of Christian residents and refused to approve any compensation for the victims.

No arrests were made in connection with the attack.

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Barnabas Fund

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